Until recently, the beginning of my workday was a run-of-the-mill affair. I would come in to the office, get a glass of water, maybe munch on an apple, and then get to work. Don’t get me wrong, I love working in Canadian history, and am generally thrilled to be an employed arts graduate; but something […]

History
In the News
canadarm-space
google-doodle-canadarm

The anniversary of the first launch of the Canadarm 31 years ago is celebrated on Google.ca with a special doodle.

The dexterous robotic space exploration tool known as the Canadarm celebrates the 31st anniversary of its launch today with a Google doodle on Google.ca.

Launched on November 13, 1981 on the U.S. Space Shuttle Columbia, the Canadarm was used to retrieve and repair satellites, move cargo, and support astronauts on spacewalks. At 15 metres in length, it operated like a human arm with six joints: two at the shoulder, one at the elbow, and three at the wrists. Its “hand” is cylindrical.

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Education
Inside TCE
Siku Quanshu
Chinese-Encyclopedia-Gong-Li

A silk painting gifted to The Canadian Encyclopedia from the President of The Chinese Encyclopedia, Gong Li.

The Canadian Encyclopedia is an overwhelming accomplishment. We can learn so much from you.” – Gong Li, president of the Chinese Encyclopedia. 

If the Chinese did not compile the first encyclopedia, as they did by some accounts, they did create the biggest. The 18th-century Siku Quanshu, a at is 2.3 million pages long, consists of over 36,000 volumes, required 300 editors and more than 4000 scribes, and has been described as “probably the most ambitious editorial enterprise in the history of the world.” Our Canadian Encyclopedia is so much younger (and smaller!) to it was a great honour for us to host a delegation from the current, 93-volume Chinese Encyclopedia.

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In the News
Literature
Reading In Canadian
canlit-is-sexy-header

January is so often bad news, and the news of M&S’s absorption into Random House dimmed the fugitive light that much more for many readers interested in Canadian literature. But one aficionado’s “misguided” response to the news has captivated the Canadian googling public this week:  Read More

History
Inside TCE
Things//Choses
Three versions of The Canadian Encyclopedia on CD-ROM.

The encyclopedia genre has played a significant role in the digital world. Even before the World Wide Web, encyclopedias were among the most successful products of the CD-ROM interim. Microsoft’s Encarta was the prime example (though it was a second-rate text licensed, not created, by the software giant), while World Book and others sold hundreds of thousands of copies to schools. Our own Canadian Encyclopedia appeared throughout the 1990s and was successful in retail as well as schools and libraries. Read More

History
Inside TCE
Vancouver In Time

The Canadian Encyclopedia is proud to present its first free app, Vancouver In Time, highlighting the quirky, little-known stories of Vancouver’s history. Download and enjoy!

History
Inside TCE
UBC history
UBC history

A student float drives through downtown Vancouver at the start of the Great Trek to Point Grey. UBC Historical Photograph Collection.

[Editor’s Note: The Canadian Encyclopedia is proud to present its first free app, Vancouver In Time, highlighting the stories of the city. The UBC students' great trek is one of 45 unique stories in the app. Download the app here.]

Students have been protesting at the University of British Columbia since the very beginning. In 1922 the university was just a muddy construction site at the tip of Point Grey. Frustrated students organized an angry march to challenge the government to live up to its promise to build the university. Read More

History
Inside TCE
Babes_Header
Babes in the Woods Murder

Stanley Park entrance, 1890s. Bailey Bros. Studio / Vancouver Public Library 19796B

[Editor’s Note: The Canadian Encyclopedia is proud to present its first free app, Vancouver In Time, highlighting the stories of the city. The "Babes in the Woods" murder is one of 45 unique stories in the app. Download the app here.]

A Parks Board gardener, clearing leaves near Beaver Lake, came across a cheap fur coat. Lifting it up, he made a grisly discovery — the skeletal remains of two young children. Dubbed the Babes in the Woods by the press, the sensational, unsolved case remains a haunting piece of Vancouver lore.

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History
Inside TCE
Cave_Header
The Cave Supper Club

A singer in the spotlight, some musicians and dancers, and those weird stalactites — the Cave experience.

[Editor’s Note: The Canadian Encyclopedia is proud to present its first free app, Vancouver In Time, highlighting the stories of the city. Vancouver's exotic Cave Supper Club is one of 45 unique stories in the app. Download the app here.]

Vancouver may be known as a No Fun City, but in the 1950s, the city had the exotic Cave. To find sophisticated entertainment in old Vancouver you went underground, into a grotto where stalactites hung from the ceiling and pirate’s gold shimmered in darkly lit corners. The Cave Supper Club hosted the world’s most famous entertainers and beautiful showgirls for 44 years. It was the rare place in subdued Vancouver to go out on a weekend evening for some risqué entertainment and exotic drinks.
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History
Inside TCE
Historic Vancouver Gastown
Historic Vancouver Gastown

Gastown as it was in 1870.

[Editor’s Note: The Canadian Encyclopedia is proud to present its first free app, Vancouver In Time, highlighting the stories of the city. Gastown's Gassy Jack is one of 45 unique stories in the app. Download the app here.]

When Capt. Jack Deighton and his family pulled their canoe onto the south shore of the Burrrard Inlet in 1867, Jack was on one more search for riches. He had been a sailor on British and American ships, rushed for gold in California and the Cariboo, piloted boats on the Fraser River and ran a tavern in New Westminster. He was broke again, but he wasted no time in starting a new business and building the settlement that would become Vancouver.

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History
birks-building
birks-building

The Birks building in 1946, looking east on Georgia Street. Vancouver Public Library.

[Editor’s Note: The Canadian Encyclopedia is proud to present its first free app, Vancouver In Time, highlighting the stories of the city. Cyclone Taylor and the Vancouver Millionaires is one of 45 unique stories in the app. Download the app here.]

The sparkling white terra cotta tiles of the Birks building lit the southeast corner of Granville and Georgia from 1913. Inside, sparkling jewelry, silver and fine china attracted the most demanding, and wealthy, clientele. It was a shock to the city when the Birks family decided to tear the impressive grand dame down in 1975.

The Montreal-based Birks jewelry chain moved its Vancouver store into the ten-storey downtown location on November 8, 1913. It had been located on the northeast corner of Granville and Hastings since 1906, when Birks bought out George Trovey’s jewelry store and adopted his trademark street clock as its own.

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History
foncie pulice
foncie pulice

Photographer Foncie Pulice.

[Editor’s Note: The Canadian Encyclopedia is proud to present its first free app, Vancouver In Time, highlighting the stories of the city. The UBC students' great trek is one of 45 unique stories in the app. Download the app here.]

If you were strolling down Granville Street in post-war Vancouver, chances are that an affable photographer would step out from behind his camera to tell you that he’d just snapped your picture. Foncie Pulice was his name, and the sidewalk was his studio.

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