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Stephen Harper on Murdoch Mysteries
Stephen Harper on Murdoch Mysteries

Image: Handout/Citytv

Tonight, Prime Minister Stephen Harper makes his small screen dramatic debut on Citytv’s Murdoch Mysteries. The show, which takes place in 19th century Toronto follows William Murdoch, an eccentric detective who uses cutting edge forensics like fingerprinting, blood testing, and surveillance to solve Victorian Toronto’s gruesome murders.

Harper makes a cameo as Desk Sergeant Armstrong, a clueless, hockey-obsessed cop who fails to recognize the then-Prime Minister Wilfrid Laurier when he walks into the police office.

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Politics
Michael Ignatieff at Much Music

Very few things are as gleeful and inherently entertaining as a politician – usually so staid and serious – dusting off his tap shoes and taking to the stage. In anticipation of Harper’s cameo on Murdoch Mysteries tonight, we present a roundup of our favourite moments of Canadian politicians in the limelight.

At Buckingham Palace in 1977, Pierre Trudeau was caught twirling a pirouette behind an oblivious Queen Elizabeth II during the G7 summit in London. The act was seized upon by both admirers and detractors. To the former, it signified his maverick charm and refusal to bow to pomp and aristocracy. To the latter, it was evidence of his irreverence and calculated showmanship. Trudeau’s was a pirouette that divided the nation. Read More

Politics
Primary Loyalties
Pierre Trudeau at the polls

Pierre Trudeau at the polls

If I were to ask you who you are, what answer would you give? The answer in this case is difficult because of the lack of context.

There are many possible identities that we might have. Some we choose for ourselves and others people try to impose on us. In the recent debate over the long-gun registry, the prime minister has apparently tried make me understand myself as something called an urban dweller. Urban dwellers are apparently fundamentally at odds with people called farmers who live in rural areas who need long guns to shoot rabbits and gophers. I think it quite reasonable for farmers to shoot rabbits. The rabbit who inhabits my back yard wreaks considerable havoc, though not sufficient to incline me to acquire a rifle and send him to bunny heaven.

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Politics
Primary Loyalties

Parliament Building
Does Stephen Harper have a hidden agenda? This was a question that many people asked about him in the last two elections. Many came to the conclusion that he didn’t. They thought that the Conservative Party was business as usual. The prime minister might be aloof. Perhaps he was a control freak. Even though you didn’t want Michael Ignatieff dropping in at your BBQ, Harper was your guest from hell.

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