History
'This 1835 painting by Robert Petley shows a black Loyalist family on the Hammonds Plains Road, with Bedford Basin in the background (courtesy Library and Archives Canada/C-115424).'
'This 1835 painting by Robert Petley shows a Black Loyalist family on the Hammonds Plains Road, with Bedford Basin in the background (courtesy Library and Archives Canada/C-115424).'

‘This 1835 painting by Robert Petley shows a Black Loyalist family on the Hammonds Plains Road, with Bedford Basin in the background (courtesy Library and Archives Canada/C-115424).’

“Freedom and a Farm.” The promise was exciting to the thousands of African-Americans, mostly runaway slaves, who were encouraged by the British to fight in British regiments against the Americans. They joined the tens of thousands of American refugees who had sided with the British during the American Revolution, and who pinned their hopes for a brighter future on the British slogan. The refugees left the newly independent states for British North America and pledged their loyalty to King George III.

Read More

History
Music
Things//Choses
africville-library-and-archives-canada

Music historian Gary Cristall explores the history and music of a segregated, ignored, and later, demolished, community in Nova Scotia.

Français
In the News

En 1863, une mystérieuse jeune Française arriva à Halifax par bateau, de New York. Ne pouvant à peine s’exprimer en anglais, elle eut beaucoup de difficulté à demander au cocher de la conduire à l’hôtel le plus proche. Il l’amena donc à l’hôtel Halifax Hotel, où est érigé maintenant le Ralston Building sur la rue Hollis, car le propriétaire des lieux parlaient français et allemand. La jeune femme s’enregistra sous le nom de Mademoiselle Lewley et dit qu’elle était venue pour retrouver un membre de sa famille installé dans la ville. On lui suggéra d’aller voir un certain Philip Lenoir, avocat francophone. Elle lui raconta qu’elle était à la recherche de son cousin, Albert Pinson, un officier britannique stationné à Halifax.

Read More

History
In the News
Literature
adele-hugo-header
ns-archives-halifax-hotel

Halifax Hotel, H. Hesslein, Proprietor. — East side of Hollis Street. 1871 Joseph S. Rogers Nova Scotia Archives negative no. N-432

In 1863 a mysterious young Frenchwoman arrived in Halifax on a packet-boat from New York. She spoke broken English and had difficulty asking the carriage-driver to take her to a hotel. He brought her to the Halifax Hotel, where the Ralston Building now stands on Hollis Street, because the proprietor there spoke French and German. The woman registered as ‘Miss Lewley’ and said she wanted to locate a relative in the city. She was directed to Philip Lenoir, a French-speaking lawyer, and told him she wanted to locate her cousin, Albert Pinson, an officer in a British regiment stationed in Halifax.

Read More

History
Nova Scotia Ghost Stories
Snow & Co., Undertakers

Pine coffins supplied to Snow & Co., Undertakers, second building from right, for victims of the Halifax Explosion. (photo: Nova Scotia Archives)

Nova Scotia is the perfect setting for scary stories. It’s somewhat remote, is foggy more days than not, and its residents love to tell a good tale. Its sea-faring culture has bred oral traditions that have cast the sea as a mighty provider and destroyer that gives and takes away. Unsurprisingly, the sea is at the center of many of Nova Scotia’s best ghost stories.

Read More

History
In the News
bluenose-header

On Saturday, September 29, the Bluenose II, a reconstructed version of Canada’s most famous ship, the Bluenose, will launch in Lunenburg, Nova Scotia!

History
Literature
thomas chandler haliburton
Thomas Chandler Haliburton

Thomas Chandler Haliburton in a lithograph by E.U. Eddis (courtesy Library and Archives Canada/C-6086).

“He drank like a fish.” “The early bird gets the worm.” “It’s raining cats and dogs.” “You can’t get blood out of a stone.” “As quick as a wink.” “Six of one and half a dozen of the other.” “There’s many a true word said in jest.” These, and many other expressions, colour our vernacular without our being aware that the satiric voice behind them belonged to Thomas Chandler Haliburton, a prominent Nova Scotian.

Haliburton was born on December 17, 1796 in Windsor, NS, the son of a judge and grandson of a lawyer. An upper crust Tory, he was also a successful lawyer and businessman and was appointed to the Supreme Court of Nova Scotia. He held office in England after his retirement from the bench. He was wealthy, respected and influential, but, despite his accomplishments, he was deeply frustrated.

Read More