Inside TCE
snow diary
The view from my backyard.

The view from my backyard.

Having told friends, family and colleagues that I dislike winter, I’ve received endless advice on how to turn my chilly frown upside down. My dear friend Myriam even provided a list of reasons to like winter. So I’m going to try again to change my attitude, and to chart my progress I’m going to keep a snow diary. All I need is some snow.

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Inside TCE
snow diary

Having told friends, family and colleagues that I dislike winter, I’ve received endless advice on how to turn my chilly frown upside down. My dear friend Myriam provided a list of reasons to like winter and the comments on Twitter have ranged from friendly to downright maniacal. So I’m going to try again to change my attitude, and to chart my […]

Inside TCE
Snowy Backyard

The view from our backyard.

Having told friends, family and colleagues that I dislike winter, I’ve received endless advice on how to turn my chilly frown upside down. My dear friend Myriam provided a list of reasons to like winter and the comments on Twitter have ranged from friendly to downright maniacal. So I’m going to try again to change my attitude, and to chart my progress I’m keeping a snow diary. All I need is some snow.

Read Part 1 of Snow Diary here. Read Part 3 of Snow Diary here.

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Literature
Stories About Storytellers
Stephen Leacock
Stories About Storytellers

Stories About Storytellers, by Douglas Gibson with illustrations by Anthony Jenkins (Copyright © Douglas Gibson, 2011 Published by ECW Press)

[Editor’s note: This is the second excerpt from Douglas Gibson’s new book Stories About Storytellers: Publishing Alice Munro, Robertson Davies, Alistair MacLeod, Pierre Trudeau, and OthersThey will run every Friday. The following is taken from the chapter on humorist Stephen Leacock.]

In my experience, every humorous writer finds that his or her public confidently expects them to be a happy person, facing life with a wry chuckle, and perhaps a slow, smiling shake of the head. To his great credit, Leacock tried to shoot down this view. He wrote: “If a man has a genuine sense of humour he is apt to take a somewhat melancholy, or at least a disillusioned view of life. Humour and disillusionment are twin sisters.”

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