English
Film
Things//Choses

Last weekend the Heritage Minutes team headed to Calgary to shoot the newest additions to our collection. These Minutes will tell two lesser-known stories of the First World War. Watch for them in the Fall – but in the meantime, here are some behind the scenes photos to tide you over!

History

I occasionally go two or three weeks without shaving, and when my hairy face begins to itch, I face a choice: a bearded fork in the road. Do I shave it off, alleviate the itch and re-join the ranks of respectable society? Or do I go full bore and attempt a glorious beard befitting a […]

History
Things//Choses

I have no distinct memory of the first time I saw a Heritage Minute. I watched a lot – like A LOT – of television as a child in the early nineties, probably more than I or my parents would like to admit. Much of it was CBC programming, if that may redeem me or […]

History

On June 12, at Ohsweken’s Six Nations Polytechnic (SNP), The Historica-Dominion Institute, premiered our newest Heritage Minute – Queenston Heights. Previously, we’d only seen the minute on our laptops and blowing it up to cinematic proportions gave it a new power. Canons and muskets crackled and boomed through the halls of the college, much to […]

Canada Soup
History
In the News
GraveQR

The Quebec film Rebelle (War Witch) has been nominated for an Oscar in the best foreign-language film category! Directed by Montreal’s Kim Nguyen, it tells the moving and heartbreaking story of child soldiers in Africa. [Montreal Gazette]

The Grammy Awards will honour legendary Toronto pianist Glenn Gould with a lifetime achievement award this February! With four Grammys to his name, the famously eccentric Gould was one of the 20th century’s most celebrated classical pianists. [Globe & Mail]

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Canada Soup
In the News
Alexander-Lincoln-header

In this week’s Canadian news roundup, a beloved politician passes, a minute launches, and Lily of the Mohawks gets canonized in Rome. It’s Canada Soup!

Lincoln Alexander, Canada’s first black MP and former Ontario lieutenant governor, has died at the age of 90. The son of a hotel maid and a railway porter, Alexander overcame racism to become a lawyer, a politician and Lieutenant-Governor of Ontario, a post he held from 1985 to 1991. In the video above, he calls himself the “Obama of Canada” and praises Canada as “the greatest country in the world, bar none.” Alexander is survived by his wife Marni, his son Keith and his extended family. [Globe & Mail]

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History
In the News
minute-header

The new Heritage Minute tells the story of Richard Pierpoint, a black Loyalist and hero during the War of 1812.

Education
World Teachers' Day

If there’s one refrain I hear over and over from my fellow teachers, it is that schools are in regular (and often desperate) need of resources. In a world of online and often unreliable resources, The Canadian Encyclopedia manages to provide a solid, well researched alternative for teachers and students of Canadiana.

But for World Teachers’ Day, I am not going to gift teachers with a diatribe on resources. As I said, it’s a regular refrain that is part of our everyday, and hardly a gift. Instead, I will use this blog post to gift them with five ideas on how to use The Canadian Encyclopedia in their classroom. Free resource and free ideas? That’s something to put a bow on.

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History
Agnes Macphail

Agnes Macphail began her career as a country schoolteacher. Interested in agricultural problems, she became a member and active spokesperson for the United Farmers of Ontario. Her move into politics stemmed from her desire to represent the farmers of her region. In 1919 women gained the right to run for Parliament, and Macphail was elected in 1921, the first federal election in which women had the vote.

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History
Jennie Trout

The names of women are conspicuously absent from the lists of famous Canadian medical pioneers. During the 19th Century, while male physicians and surgeons were exploring new treatments and innovative medical procedures, Canadian women were struggling for the mere right to practice medicine. For them, acceptance into a medical school was a major achievement. The two women most responsible for breaking down the barriers and advancing medical training for women in Canada were Emily Stowe and Jennie Kidd Trout.

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