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In the News
Air Canada Strike

Canada Post stamps commemorating the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the Titanic.

With Air Canada staff staging a wildcat strike today (including a horrific incident involving a man spitting into a baggage handler’s face) the CBC reviews the ailing airline’s history of labour strife. [CBC]

In a major legal decision, the Supreme Court of Canada decided that judges who do not consider lenient or creative sentences for aboriginal offenders are violating the law. The decision has been so polarizing (and energizing) that the Globe & Mail article, posted today, has received over 900 comments, some insightful, others deeply offensive. The crux of the matter seems to be this: how far does historic disadvantage (including institutionalized racism and oppression) extend?

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History

The Historica-Dominion Institute, in partnership with Fort York National Historic Site, presents the first of their 1812 Shorts in celebration of the bicentennial of the War of 1812. In this video, Ojibway writer Drew Hayden Taylor discusses the role of First Nations in the War of 1812. Stay tuned for more videos in the series. […]

History
codex canadensis
codex canadensis

The inside back cover of Codex canadensis (Gilcrease Museum).

The Codex Canadensis, one of Canada’s most important documents, a more than 300-year-old illustrated manuscript, depicting the flora, fauna, and life of the Native Peoples at the beginning of European settlement, will be published in book form for the first time by McGill-Queen’s University Press.

Created by the Jesuit priest Louis Nicholas around 1675, the codex’s illustrations and descriptions of Native life paint a rich and curious portrait of 17th century Canada. “His ink drawings of animals such as bears, birds and beavers — some laughably crude by today’s standards — were cutting-edge contributions at the time to European knowledge of the natural world,” writes Randy Boswell in Postmedia News. Read More

History
northern-lights
winter-storm

Winter wind storm (photo: Thomas Kitchin)

The Canadian north has captivated storytellers for hundreds of years with its mystery and beauty. Man was first evident in the Yukon over 15,000 years ago when migration began over the Beringia land-bridge after the last ice age. Over thousands of years, the First Nations people settled in the Yukon and developed their own unique languages and cultures.

How Fox Point Got Its Name

The North’s oral storytelling tradition has passed on amazing and spooky legends. The Fox Point tale tells of a group of people moving from place to place to find food. The group was low on supplies and decided to go back to the Nisutlin Bay to find salmon. An old woman among them dreamt that something awful would happen if they returned to that spot. No one listened to her, and they continued on their journey. She warned them: “There will be signs, the first will be a lynx, the second a wolverine and then finally a fox. When we have seen all three signs, we will perish.”
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