In the News

A soldier and a girl fervently embrace on an otherwise empty railroad platform at night, the lamps in the background blurry, the tracks sweeping past clean and precise. A dark horse gallops along a railroad track at dusk,  while a train slowly grinds toward it across a treeless expanse, steam trailing off into a cloudy sky. Both Soldier and […]

History
In the News

I had been looking forward to this day for weeks. On Friday, 28 June 2013, a fleet of Tall Ships sailed into Hamilton Harbour on Lake Ontario as part of the War of 1812 bicentennial. I had arranged to leave work early, catching the bus from Toronto to Hamilton in time to see the ships arrive. What […]

Flags

Happy Canada Day! We asked The Historica-Dominion Institute staff to share what Canada Day means to them – here’s what we heard: Dominique: Canada Day for me is feeling the warm sun on the moss-covered crags of the Canadian shield after a long winter. The smell of gasoline as Dad filled up the car to […]

Just in time for Canada Day, The Historica-Dominion Institute’s President Anthony Wilson-Smith shares his memories of being a Canadian overseas: In 1988 I had just moved to what was still then the USSR for the start of a three year journalism posting in Moscow.  When the time arrived for my first visit to the Kremlin, […]

History
Photo: Governor General’s Foot Guards Receives Colours from Governor General, ca. 1943-1965
© Government of Canada. Reproduced with the permission of the Minister of Public Works and Government Services Canada (2013).
Source: Library and Archives Canada/Department of National Defence fonds/e010783023

Just in time for Canada Day, our own Richard Foot shares his memories of Canada Day as a member of the Governor General’s Foot Guards: Most of us have at least one special Canada Day memory: a July 1st weekend at a lakeside cottage when the weather was just perfect, or a night of fireworks […]

History
88245

On June 7th, 1939, Canada denied entry to over 900 Jewish refugees aboard the MS St. Louis. Seventy-two years later, Canada’s part in the fate of the MS St. Louis was officially remembered with the unveiling of Daniel Libeskind’s “Wheel of Conscience” monument, at the Canadian Museum of Immigration. As Canada assumes chairmanship of the […]

History
D-Day

69 years ago, on June 6, 1944 Canadians, alongside their fellow Allied soldiers, sailors, and airmen, participated in D-Day, the invasion of Normandy, France and the first step towards the liberation of continental Europe in the Second World War. Canadians performed a wide variety of tasks on D-Day.  In advance of the invading force, paratroopers […]

English
Things//Choses
CPR-last-spike

The driving of the last spike – one of the most famous and iconic photos in Canadian history (photo by Ross Best & Co, courtesy Library and Archives Canada).

A nation is a group of people who share the same illusions about themselves. Academics call it imagining a community. Vancouver cyberpunk novelist William Gibson calls it “consensual hallucination.” Whatever you call it, April Fools seems like a good opportunity to think about some of the illusions Canadians have about ourselves.

One illusion we share is that we don’t know enough about our own history. The arrival of Canada Day invariably brings with it another poll showing how few Canadians can name three prime ministers, or know the words to the national anthem, or some other piece of national esoterica. The implication being a) this is a bad thing and b) people in other countries know more. Both these assumptions are wrong. The same polls, with the same results, appear with regularity in the United States and I imagine in other countries as well. Canadians may not know much history, but neither does anyone else.

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History
Canada Flag

On February 15, 1965, at hundreds of ceremonies across the country and around the world, the red and white Canadian maple leaf flag was raised for the first time.

In Ottawa, 10,000 people gathered on a chilly and snow-covered Parliament Hill. At precisely noon, the guns on nearby Nepean Point sounded as the sun broke through the clouds. An RCMP constable, 26-year old Joseph Secours, hoisted the flag to the top of a specially-erected white staff, and a sudden breeze snapped the maple leaf to attention.

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English
History
Music
Things//Choses

“Throwing back his head he played for us, for the first time, the masterpiece of his genius – it was Calixa Lavallée; he played O Canada.”

History
the naming of Canada
Canada's Name Efisga

Illustration by Laura Bonikowsky

Naming a country is no small task. The name should evoke feelings of pride and strength and reflect the character of the land and its people. The explorer Jacques Cartier generally gets the credit for naming Canada; he documented the name in his journal, describing the “Kingdom of Canada” and noting that the entrance to the St. Lawrence River “is the way to and the beginning of…the route to Canada.” However, the story of the country’s naming is not his alone.

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English
History
Things//Choses
Fathers of Confederation, 50th Anniversary Stamp of Confederation 1917

There were celebrations on July 1, 1867 for the new “Dominion of Canada,” but neither the date, name nor designation were sure things a few months before.