Canada Soup
In the News
hadfield-robertson-duet-header

Get ready for a space jam! For the first time ever, music has been made from space. Astronaut Chris Hadfield and Barenaked Ladies frontman Ed Robertson sang live together – Hadfield from the International Space Station and Robertson and a youth choir from Toronto. Their song, I.S.S. (‘Is Somebody Singing)’, written by Hadfield and Robertson, premiered on Friday morning. Watch it above. It’s pretty catchy! [CBC]

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History
Literature

The Great Black North: Contemporary African Canadian Poetry, edited by Valerie Mason-John and Kevan Anthony Cameron (Frontenac House, 2013).The first national anthology of poetry by African Canadians will be released in celebration of Black History Month this February. Published by Frontenac HouseThe Great Black North: Contemporary African Canadian Poetry features the works of over 90 poets across Canada.

The poets are a diverse bunch in terms of form, history and geography. From big cities to small towns, the west coast to the Maritimes and beyond Canada’s borders to countries of origin like Somalia, Nigeria, Jamaica and Kenya, these poets bring a diverse voice and a unique history that weaves together the struggles and victories that have formed the African-Canadian experience.

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History
'This 1835 painting by Robert Petley shows a black Loyalist family on the Hammonds Plains Road, with Bedford Basin in the background (courtesy Library and Archives Canada/C-115424).'
'This 1835 painting by Robert Petley shows a Black Loyalist family on the Hammonds Plains Road, with Bedford Basin in the background (courtesy Library and Archives Canada/C-115424).'

‘This 1835 painting by Robert Petley shows a Black Loyalist family on the Hammonds Plains Road, with Bedford Basin in the background (courtesy Library and Archives Canada/C-115424).’

“Freedom and a Farm.” The promise was exciting to the thousands of African-Americans, mostly runaway slaves, who were encouraged by the British to fight in British regiments against the Americans. They joined the tens of thousands of American refugees who had sided with the British during the American Revolution, and who pinned their hopes for a brighter future on the British slogan. The refugees left the newly independent states for British North America and pledged their loyalty to King George III.

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History
underground-railroad

Between 1840 and 1860, more than 30,000 American slaves came secretly to Canada to find freedom.

“When my feet first touched the Canadian shore, I threw myself on the ground, rolled in the sand, seized handfuls of it and kissed them.” These were the words of Josiah Henson recalling his first moments as a free man. Henson had escaped to Canada along the “underground railroad,” a network of secret paths, hiding places and safe houses that stretched from southern states to the borders of Canada. Like countless other immigrants, Henson came to Canada as a refugee escaping brutality and oppression.

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History
jackie robinson

The 1997 baseball season belonged to the memory of Jackie Roosevelt Robinson, the African American who broke Major League Baseball’s colour barrier fifty years earlier. In commemoration of Robinson’s courage, integrity, and determined excellence as a player and as a model for young people, every major league player wore a Jackie Robinson insignia, and Robinson’s uniform number, 42, was retired by every team in the National and American Leagues.

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History
Music
Things//Choses
africville-library-and-archives-canada

Music historian Gary Cristall explores the history and music of a segregated, ignored, and later, demolished, community in Nova Scotia.

Music
Music Mondays
underground railroad
Advertisement from the Halifax Gazette, 30 May, 1752. Slavery was an accepted part of 18-century life in the colonies. Most slaves worked as domestic servants (courtesy Massachusetts Historical Society, Boston).

Advertisement from the Halifax Gazette, 30 May, 1752. Slavery was an accepted part of 18-century life in the colonies. Most slaves worked as domestic servants (courtesy Massachusetts Historical Society, Boston).

The Underground Railroad was a network of conspirators working to help slaves escape the United States to find refuge in the British Empire and other places where slavery was illegal. In 1850, the United States Congress passed the Fugitive Slave Act, which helped slave owners recapture their escaped human “property.” The act put escaped or free Blacks living in non-slave states in danger. Freedom was found through the underground railroad. 

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Canada Soup
In the News
Alexander-Lincoln-header

In this week’s Canadian news roundup, a beloved politician passes, a minute launches, and Lily of the Mohawks gets canonized in Rome. It’s Canada Soup!

Lincoln Alexander, Canada’s first black MP and former Ontario lieutenant governor, has died at the age of 90. The son of a hotel maid and a railway porter, Alexander overcame racism to become a lawyer, a politician and Lieutenant-Governor of Ontario, a post he held from 1985 to 1991. In the video above, he calls himself the “Obama of Canada” and praises Canada as “the greatest country in the world, bar none.” Alexander is survived by his wife Marni, his son Keith and his extended family. [Globe & Mail]

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History
In the News
minute-header

The new Heritage Minute tells the story of Richard Pierpoint, a black Loyalist and hero during the War of 1812.

Music
Music Mondays
The Nathaniel Dett Chorale
The Nathaniel Dett Chorale

The Nathaniel Dett Chorale in the courtyard at St. George the Martyr in Toronto. Image: The Nathaniel Dett Chorale

In celebration of black history month, the Encyclopedia of Music in Canada is pleased to launch an article on the Nathaniel Dett Chorale. The Chorale is a Toronto based, 22-voice professional chamber choir founded in 1998 by conductor Brainerd Blyden-Taylor. It was named for the performer, composer and pedagogue Nathaniel Dett and was the first choir in Canada to actively promote Afrocentric music. The Nathaniel Dett Chorale is the only Canadian professional choral ensemble to comprise, but not entirely, members of African-Canadian descent.

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Canada Soup
In the News
Canada soccer
joe-fortes

Joe Fortes teaching swimming at English Bay, Vancouver, circa 1912. Vancouver Archives

Statistics Canada released its 2011 census information this Wednesday. The National Post has a nifty infographic that visually lays out changes in population growth. Lets take a look at the changing face of our nation, shall we?
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History
Music
measha-header
measha brueggergosman

Measha Brueggergosman performs with Opera Atelier in Toronto. Image: Bruce Zinger.


February is Black History Month! Throughout the month, TCE Blog will be highlighting Black Canadian heroes and historic events that have shaped the rich history of Canada.

Measha Brueggergosman (née Gosman) was born to Anne Eatmon and Sterling Gosman in Fredericton, New Brunswick, becoming at least the eighth generation of her family in Canada. At the time of the American War of Independence, African Americans were offered their freedom if they fought for the British, and many accepted, heading to Canada—especially the Maritime provinces.

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