History
In the News
Toronto in Time

Who says time travel is impossible? The Canadian Encyclopedia, a program of the Historica-Dominion Institute, is pleased to take you on a trip through time in its second free app in its “Cities in Time” series, Toronto in Time. Read More

History
In the News
Marilyn-Bell
Marilyn Bell

Marilyn Bell starting her swim, September 8, 1954 (courtesy Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame).

[Editor's Note: The Canadian Encyclopedia is proud to present its second free app, Toronto in Time, highlighting the stories of the city. “Marilyn Bell Swims Lake Ontario” is one of over 160 unique stories in the app, available for iOS and Android.]

Marilyn Bell waded into the frigid waters of Lake Ontario at Youngstown, NY, at 11:07 p.m. September 8, 1954. It wasn’t supposed to be a race, but she made it into one. The Canadian National Exhibition had offered $10,000 to American swimmer Florence Chadwick to swim the lake. Many thought it was unfair not to include Canadians in the event. Only two others took up the challenge, Winnie Roach Leuszla and 16-year old Marilyn Bell.

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History
Leafs_Last_Cup_header
Leafs_Last_Cup_main

Toronto Maple Leafs centre Dave Keon was awarded the Conn Smythe Trophy in 1967 (courtesy Hockey Hall of Fame).

[Editor's Note: The Canadian Encyclopedia is proud to present its second free app, Toronto in Time, highlighting the stories of the city. “The Maple Leaf's Last Stanley Cup” is one of over 160 unique stories in the app, available for iOS and Android.]

No one expected the 1967 Maple Leafs to win the Stanley Cup and no one expected that it might never happen again! The Leafs themselves that year knew they were flawed. They were mostly old, erratic, tired and had a poisonous relationship with their coach and general manager “Punch” Imlach. They lost the first game of the playoffs against the highly favoured Chicago Black Hawks but then the magic began as the goaltending of 42-year old Johnny Bower and 37-year old Terry Sawchuk turned back a dispirited Hawks team.

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History
Inside TCE
Things//Choses
Three versions of The Canadian Encyclopedia on CD-ROM.

The encyclopedia genre has played a significant role in the digital world. Even before the World Wide Web, encyclopedias were among the most successful products of the CD-ROM interim. Microsoft’s Encarta was the prime example (though it was a second-rate text licensed, not created, by the software giant), while World Book and others sold hundreds of thousands of copies to schools. Our own Canadian Encyclopedia appeared throughout the 1990s and was successful in retail as well as schools and libraries. Read More

History
Inside TCE
Vancouver In Time

The Canadian Encyclopedia is proud to present its first free app, Vancouver In Time, highlighting the quirky, little-known stories of Vancouver’s history. Download and enjoy!

History
Inside TCE
UBC history
UBC history

A student float drives through downtown Vancouver at the start of the Great Trek to Point Grey. UBC Historical Photograph Collection.

[Editor’s Note: The Canadian Encyclopedia is proud to present its first free app, Vancouver In Time, highlighting the stories of the city. The UBC students' great trek is one of 45 unique stories in the app. Download the app here.]

Students have been protesting at the University of British Columbia since the very beginning. In 1922 the university was just a muddy construction site at the tip of Point Grey. Frustrated students organized an angry march to challenge the government to live up to its promise to build the university. Read More

History
Inside TCE
Music
Vancouver Buddha Punk
Vancouver Buddha Punk

The local band 54-40 rescued and restored the famed Smiling Buddha neon sign and donated it to the Vancouver Museum.

[Editor’s Note: The Canadian Encyclopedia is proud to present its first free app, Vancouver In Time, highlighting the stories of the city. The rise and fall of Vancouver's punk scene is one of 45 unique stories in the app. Download the app here.]
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History
Inside TCE
Vancouver_Millionaires
Vancouver_Millionaires

The 1915 Millionaires, in maroon jerseys with the Vancouver V. Cyclone Taylor is second from the left in the back row.

[Editor’s Note: The Canadian Encyclopedia is proud to present its first free app, Vancouver In Time, highlighting the stories of the city. Cyclone Taylor and the Vancouver Millionaires is one of 45 unique stories in the app. Download the app here.]

Vancouver is a hockey-mad city. At the start of each season, fans expect that it will be “their time” — when their beloved Canucks will go all the way to become Stanley Cup champions. It happened once before, back in the days of the Pacific Coast Hockey Association, when Cyclone Taylor led the Vancouver Millionaires to hockey glory in old Denman Arena. Read More

History
Inside TCE
Komagata Maru

Sikhs aboard the Komagata Maru.

[Editor’s Note: The Canadian Encyclopedia is proud to present its first free app, Vancouver In Time, highlighting the stories of the city. The Komagata Maru is one of 45 unique stories in the app. Download the app here.]

The steamer Komagata Maru arrived in Vancouver harbour in May 1914 with more than 370 passengers from India on board. They were looking to begin new lives in Canada, but the authorities said No. The standoff lasted two months and ended in mayhem and murder. Read More

History
Inside TCE
Babes_Header
Babes in the Woods Murder

Stanley Park entrance, 1890s. Bailey Bros. Studio / Vancouver Public Library 19796B

[Editor’s Note: The Canadian Encyclopedia is proud to present its first free app, Vancouver In Time, highlighting the stories of the city. The "Babes in the Woods" murder is one of 45 unique stories in the app. Download the app here.]

A Parks Board gardener, clearing leaves near Beaver Lake, came across a cheap fur coat. Lifting it up, he made a grisly discovery — the skeletal remains of two young children. Dubbed the Babes in the Woods by the press, the sensational, unsolved case remains a haunting piece of Vancouver lore.

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History
Inside TCE
Cave_Header
The Cave Supper Club

A singer in the spotlight, some musicians and dancers, and those weird stalactites — the Cave experience.

[Editor’s Note: The Canadian Encyclopedia is proud to present its first free app, Vancouver In Time, highlighting the stories of the city. Vancouver's exotic Cave Supper Club is one of 45 unique stories in the app. Download the app here.]

Vancouver may be known as a No Fun City, but in the 1950s, the city had the exotic Cave. To find sophisticated entertainment in old Vancouver you went underground, into a grotto where stalactites hung from the ceiling and pirate’s gold shimmered in darkly lit corners. The Cave Supper Club hosted the world’s most famous entertainers and beautiful showgirls for 44 years. It was the rare place in subdued Vancouver to go out on a weekend evening for some risqué entertainment and exotic drinks.
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History
Inside TCE
Historic Vancouver Gastown
Historic Vancouver Gastown

Gastown as it was in 1870.

[Editor’s Note: The Canadian Encyclopedia is proud to present its first free app, Vancouver In Time, highlighting the stories of the city. Gastown's Gassy Jack is one of 45 unique stories in the app. Download the app here.]

When Capt. Jack Deighton and his family pulled their canoe onto the south shore of the Burrrard Inlet in 1867, Jack was on one more search for riches. He had been a sailor on British and American ships, rushed for gold in California and the Cariboo, piloted boats on the Fraser River and ran a tavern in New Westminster. He was broke again, but he wasted no time in starting a new business and building the settlement that would become Vancouver.

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