History

The first weekend of August is one of the few long summer weekends Ontarians have to rush to the cottage. Those of us in Toronto know it as Simcoe Day, because John Graves Simcoe was lieutenant-governor of Upper Canada from 1791 to 1796 and was an early figure in the foundation of York (later Toronto). […]

Français
History

La guerre de Corée sera toujours la « Guerre oubliée », ce qui n’est pas forcément une mauvaise chose, car les gens associent souvent une guerre à son surnom ou à un nom de substitution – par exemple, pour la Première Guerre mondiale on parle de la « Grande Guerre » ou de la « Der des ders ». L’an dernier, […]

History
Canadian soldiers' arrival in Tokyo, Japan, after announcement of the Korean War armistice being signed, 27 July 1953. Fred Joyce.

The Korean War will always be the “Forgotten War.”  This is not necessarily a bad thing, as people often remember wars by their monikers, or alternative names – for example, the First World War as the “Great War” or the “war to end all wars.”  Last year, my colleague Andrea reviewed the reasons why the […]

History
D-Day

69 years ago, on June 6, 1944 Canadians, alongside their fellow Allied soldiers, sailors, and airmen, participated in D-Day, the invasion of Normandy, France and the first step towards the liberation of continental Europe in the Second World War. Canadians performed a wide variety of tasks on D-Day.  In advance of the invading force, paratroopers […]

History
Literature
Reading In Canadian
titanic-poems

A line from Thomas Hardy’s “Convergence of the Twain.”

The sinking of the Titanic has resonated now for 100 years in the consciousness of Canadians. The grief, wonder, and curiosity the disaster continues to inspire has been the impetus for countless literary works. While the majority of these are factual or biographical, significant imaginative works of poetry and prose have been produced, works that strive to understand the psychological, social and personal effects of the disaster. Here, then, is a survey of some of the most important works of poetry produced on the subject of the sinking of the Titanic, poetry read and loved by, and for the most part produced by, Canadians.

Read More

History
In the News
titanic departs southampton

The Titanic, named for the Titans, or god-giants of Greek mythology, was the largest (269 m), most luxurious ocean liner to its time. It was touted to be unsinkable, but it struck an iceberg just before midnight on April 14, 1912, on the fifth day of its maiden voyage, and sank in 2 hours, 40 minutes, with the loss of 1513-1522 lives, including the captain and Canadian railway tycoon Charles Melville Hays.

Read More

History
In the News
Halifax Titanic
halifax-receiving-bodies

Recovered bodies from the RMS Titanic arriving at the Mayflower Curling Club, Agricola Street which was set up as a temporary morgue, 1912. Image: Nova Scotia Archives.

Halifax’s role in the aftermath of the Titanic’s sinking has often been described as the great ship’s undertaker. St. John’s, Newfoundland, was closer to the wreck site, but Halifax was the closest port with railway and steamship connections to the United States.

Read More

History
In the News
titanic-saving-bodies-header
Titanic Bodies

Body of RMS Titanic victim aboard rescue vessel CS Minia being made ready for make-shift coffin. Image: Nova Scotia Archives

For the 328 people whose bodies were recovered at the site of the Titanic disaster, unique fatality reports  were created. They speak volumes about those whose bodies were retrieved. From third-class passengers to millionaires, these reports document their lives through what they had on their person that fateful night.

Read More

Inside TCE
Music

The Encyclopedia of Music in CanadaAs a librarian, I can attest that reference publications like The Encyclopedia of Music in Canada (EMC) are, if anything, all that much more important in the online era. The “born digital” generation, which has little experience with the traditional library, seems disinclined to spend time exploring print collections. But there is strong interest in the digital versions of such publications, which supply authoritative surveys of subjects as well as departure points for further investigation.

EMC has been provided with open access on the Web by the Historica Foundation (now Historica-Dominion Institute) since 2003, when it was incorporated into The Canadian Encyclopedia (TCE). The not-for-profit institute celebrates the thirtieth anniversary of the publication of the first edition of EMC as it maintains and builds on that original work.

Read More

Français
Inside TCE
Music
Encyclopedia of Music in Canada
Encyclopedia of Music in Canada

L’Encyclopédie de la musique au Canada , 1982.

Quand Helmut Kallmann fit paraître A History of Music in Canada 1534-1914 en 1960, aucun ouvrage aussi complet ni aussi minutieusement documenté n’avait jamais été publié sur ce sujet, que ce soit en anglais ou en français. Quand je lui demandai ce qu’il comptait faire pour se surpasser, Helmut Kallmann me répondit que ses réflexions avaient abouti à deux possibilités : soit un dictionnaire qui respecterait l’ordre alphabétique et qui porterait sur la musique et la vie musicale au Canada, soit un ouvrage d’érudition, en plusieurs volumes fort probablement, qui préserverait la musique publiée la plus marquante dans l’histoire du Canada. Cette prédiction ne faisait que jeter un aperçu sur le travail qu’il allait consacrer à ce qui serait bientôt : L’Encyclopédie de la musique au Canada.

Read More

Inside TCE
Music
Encyclopedia of Music in Canada 30
Encyclopedia of Music in Canada

The cover of the Encyclopedia of Music in Canada, first edition, third printing, 1982.

[Editor's Note: the following is an abridged excerpt from Unheard Of: Memoirs of a Canadian Composer by John Beckwith. (Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2012.)]

When Helmut Kallmann’s A History of Music in Canada 1534-1914 appeared in 1960, nothing half as thorough or as finely documented had ever been produced, either in English or in French, on this topic. When I asked what he planned to do for an encore, he thought his findings suggested two directions – an alphabetically organized dictionary about music and musical life in Canada, or a scholarly edition, probably in several volumes, preserving the most significant published music of the country’s past. This prediction amounted to an outline of his work on the Encyclopedia of Music in Canada.

Read More

Music
Glenn Gould

Glenn Gould
A handsome young man walks on stage and takes a furtive glance at his audience. He settles awkwardly into a rickety, cut-down chair, hunches over and reaches for the piano keyboard. With the first note he is transformed, now more angel than gargoyle. He sways rhythmically, humming, closing his eyes in ecstasy, a free hand molding a musical sculpture in the air. Chords and arpeggios fly effortlessly from his fingers, notes ripple like pearls and inner voices are revealed.

Read More