History
The Empress Hotel Victoria
craigdarroch-castle

Craigdorroch Castle, Victoria, circa 1890 (photo by Garrett Smith, courtesy BC Archives and Records/H-02479).

There’s a nightlife in beautiful, historic Victoria, B.C., far more exclusive than the hottest dance clubs. In fact, you and I aren’t even invited. This is a nightlife alive with the afterlife. If you want to get down with paranormal activity, Victoria is the hottest place in the west for the coldest spirits. I’ll be your tour guide. After all, hunting ghosts is my hobby

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History
ve-day-canada

My grandfather John R. Surtees, a CANLOAN officer, 1945.

In Ottawa, a simple memorial stands in a park along the Rideau Canal. On it are the names, CDN numbers and British Regiments of the 128 men who died in Europe during the Second World War as CANLOAN soldiers. The memorial is inscribed:

“Erected by the Governments of Canada and the United Kingdom, the British Regiments, the CANLOAN Army Officers’ Association, and CANLOAN next-of-kin. Designated CANLOAN, 673 Canadian Officers volunteered for loan to the British Army and took part in the invasion and liberation of Europe 1944-45. CANLOAN total casualties were 465, of which 128 were fatal. Their fallen are honoured in this quiet place in gratitude and remembrance of the cost of liberty”.

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History
de-havilland-mosquito
de-havilland-mosquitos

Pathfinder Mosquitos flew at low altitudes, visually identifying their targets and marking them.

de Havilland Canada‘s legacy lies in creating aircraft that are essentially Canadian – weatherproof, utilitarian and beautiful in a rugged way. Their planes are built to battle through Canada’s severe elements, but have also proven durable in all climates of the globe, essentially being Canada’s global ambassadors of the sky. de Havilland Canada has proven to the world that when you build aircraft to defeat Canada’s wilderness, you’ve created aircraft capable of defeating any spot on the globe. It rekindles the legends of the first pilots – adventurers, daredevils, fearless heroes – in anyone buzzing over land, water, sand and ice in de Havilland’s  very Canadian wings.
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History
Canada Dry ad

Photo: The Digital Deli Online

S’il y a un breuvage populaire qui s’accommode bien de tous les événements, qui peut être dégusté autant par les enfants que par les adultes – qui d’ailleurs peuvent le mélanger à leurs liqueurs préférées- et qui peut même guérir les estomacs dérangés, c’est bien le Ginger Ale.

C’est en 1904 qu’en Ontario, le pharmacien et chimiste John J. McLaughin inventa le ginger ale (son frère, Robert Samuel McLaughlin, possédait la compagnie, McLaughlin Motor Car Company qui devint plus tard la General Motors of Canada). Le breuvage original de McLaughlin servait d’abord comme une eau soda à mélanger avec des jus de fruits et des extraits aromatisés; le résultat cependant ne fut pas au goût de son inventeur. La couleur du ginger ale était trop foncée et le goût trop sucré pour monsieur McLaughin qui recherchait avant tout la ressemblance avec les champagnes français, clairs et pétillants. Après plusieurs expériences en laboratoire, il trouva l’équilibre parfait et le Canada Dry Pale Ginger Ale, au vrai gingembre, fut lancé à Toronto en 1907.

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History
canada dry ad
Canada Dry Ad

An ad for Canada Dry, the best “Ginger-Upper!” Photo: The Digital Deli Online

There’s one all-purpose, go-to beverage for the holidays – one that kids can drink, adults can mix with liquor, and both can use later for an upset stomach. It’s not eggnog or hot chocolate, but Canada Dry ginger ale!

The drink was invented in 1904 by Ontario pharmacist and chemist John J. McLaughlin (brother of Robert Samuel McLaughlin, whose McLaughlin Motor Car Company later became General Motors of Canada). McLaughlin’s ginger ale was intentionally formulated as a soda water for mixing with fruit juice and flavoured extracts, but it wasn’t perfect. The colour of the ginger ale was too dark and the taste too sweet for McLaughlin, who wanted it to be on par with “dry” and clear sparkling French champagnes. After some time experimenting in the lab, he found the perfect balance, and Canada Dry Pale Ginger Ale, with real ginger, was patented in Toronto in 1907.

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