Politics
Primary Loyalties

Jack Layton’s last letter to Canadians was, as everyone was told from the very beginning, a collegial affair.  Layton, party president Brian Topp, chief of staff Anne McGrath, and his wife and colleague Olivia Chow all had input into the final draft.

The letter was hortatory rhetoric, defined as writing that encourages its audience to pursue, or not pursue, some course of action rather than another.

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Politics
Primary Loyalties

NDP Leader Ed Broadbent, Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau and Progressive Conservative Party Leader Joe Clark during a televised debate during the 1979 election. May 13, 1979.

In 1980, Pierre Trudeau defeated Joe Clark’s bumbling regime and formed a new Liberal government. However, he faced a serious problem constructing his cabinet. The voters of western Canada showed they did not much like the prime minister who had taunted them with the question, “Why should I sell your wheat?”

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In the News
Politics
Jack Layton and Kate Makarow
Jack Layton and Kate

Jack Layton and Kate Makarow

With the passing of Jack Layton last week we’ve lost a charismatic and engaging leader and a strong voice for our country. We’ve also lost one of our biggest advocates for young Canadians. One of the things I loved the most about Jack was his commitment to engaging young people and encouraging their participation in politics. I became involved with the NDP while studying at the University of Ottawa. In September 2006 I went down to a small bar on campus where Jack and his wife Olivia Chow were coming to talk to students. There was no election on and no campaign in sight; they were just taking time to check in.

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In the News
Politics
Primary Loyalties

Stephen Harper restored the “Royal” in Royal Canadian Air Force and Royal Canadian Navy. He had no need to in the case of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police or the Royal Mint. In the case of the military changes, who can say if it’s a good or a bad idea? It draws attention to Canada’s heritage.  It will cost millions in terms of simple things like changes in stationery.

However, constitutionally ill-informed critics have had a field day. “Harper is re-colonializing Canada.” “Canadians are becoming subordinate to the Queen of England.”

Poppycock.
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Politics

Jack Layton

Our friend and contributor to The Canadian Encyclopedia, Alan Whitehorn of the Royal Military College of Canada, explains the significance of Jack Layton’s legacy and the unique role of the New Democratic Party in Canada on Radio Canada International. Some highlights:

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Politics
layton2

On August 22, 2011, Jack Layton, the leader of the New Democrats, died after a brief and aggressive battle with an unnamed cancer. He was 61. Just months before, he led his party to unprecedented electoral success, becoming the Official Opposition in this year’s federal election in his last amazing race.

Jack Layton

The Honourable Jack Layton, who was the leader of the New Democratic Party of Canada (NDP) (courtesy NDP).

Everything about Jack Layton’s rally at Montreal’s Olympia Theatre, the biggest campaign event ever staged by the NDP in Quebec, had a sort of retro flair. There was the 1925 theatre itself, with its rococo red-and-gold plaster details. There was the lead-on band, the aptly named Quebec group Tracteur Jack, which played hopped-up swing. When Layton made his grand entrance, wading through a roaring crowd of more than 1,200, jauntily wielding the wooden cane he carries after hip surgery, he leapt to the podium like a barnstorming politician of old. Now that he’s 60, that signature moustache, which once recalled the disco era, looks more like a tribute to his social-democratic forebears. Some of his applause lines have a time-honoured left-wing ring, too. “A prime minister’s job,” he declares to cheers, “is to make sure the government works for those who have elected him, and not for big corporations.”

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In the News
Politics
Air Command crest

The Air Command crest

The intention of the Government of Canada in its August 2011 re-designation of three components of the Canadian Forces, namely Maritime Command, Land Force Command and Air Command as the Royal Canadian Navy, the Canadian Army and the Royal Canadian Air Force has been met with praise and derision by civilians and armed forces personnel alike. The government contends the restoration of these historical names is important to our heritage and is necessary to improve pride in the armed forces. Critics harp on several themes, including the expense of the name changes and more fundamentally, the nature of our constitutional monarchy.

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Politics
Michael Ignatieff at Much Music

Very few things are as gleeful and inherently entertaining as a politician – usually so staid and serious – dusting off his tap shoes and taking to the stage. In anticipation of Harper’s cameo on Murdoch Mysteries tonight, we present a roundup of our favourite moments of Canadian politicians in the limelight.

At Buckingham Palace in 1977, Pierre Trudeau was caught twirling a pirouette behind an oblivious Queen Elizabeth II during the G7 summit in London. The act was seized upon by both admirers and detractors. To the former, it signified his maverick charm and refusal to bow to pomp and aristocracy. To the latter, it was evidence of his irreverence and calculated showmanship. Trudeau’s was a pirouette that divided the nation. Read More

English
Events//Fait
History
In the News
Politics

I had the most remarkable sense of historical context while reading Deborah Lipstadt’s book The Eichmann Trial at the very time President Barack Obama announced that American forces had invaded Pakistan and killed Osama Bin Laden. Lipstadt recounts the remarkable reaction in the United States to Eichmann’s abduction from Argentina.

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Politics
Primary Loyalties
Pierre Trudeau at the polls

Pierre Trudeau at the polls

If I were to ask you who you are, what answer would you give? The answer in this case is difficult because of the lack of context.

There are many possible identities that we might have. Some we choose for ourselves and others people try to impose on us. In the recent debate over the long-gun registry, the prime minister has apparently tried make me understand myself as something called an urban dweller. Urban dwellers are apparently fundamentally at odds with people called farmers who live in rural areas who need long guns to shoot rabbits and gophers. I think it quite reasonable for farmers to shoot rabbits. The rabbit who inhabits my back yard wreaks considerable havoc, though not sufficient to incline me to acquire a rifle and send him to bunny heaven.

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Politics
Primary Loyalties

Parliament Building
Does Stephen Harper have a hidden agenda? This was a question that many people asked about him in the last two elections. Many came to the conclusion that he didn’t. They thought that the Conservative Party was business as usual. The prime minister might be aloof. Perhaps he was a control freak. Even though you didn’t want Michael Ignatieff dropping in at your BBQ, Harper was your guest from hell.

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